Islets of Hope for persons newly diagnosed with diabetes

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Article by Lahle Wolfe. For reprint information e-mail: Editor@isletsofhope.com

diabetes forums
diabetes support lists
diabetes blog

Links to more comprehensive information on complications of diabetes

Amputation
Blindness
Diabetic Ketoacidosis
Diabetic Neuropathy
Diabetic Retinopathy
Eating Disorders
Erectile Dysfunctions
Foot & Skin Problems
Frozen Shoulder
Gastroparesis
Gum Disease
Heart Problems
High Blood Pressure
Infections
Infertility
Insulin Shock
Kidney Problems
Lactic Acidosis
Seizures & Coma
Peripheral Artery Disease
Sexual Problems
Urologic Problems
Weight Gain
Weight Loss
Wound Care


think like a pancreas  Gary Scheiner, CDE
Think Like a Pancreas:
 Many books offer advice on managing diabetes, but few focus specifically on the day-to-day issues facing those who use insulin.  Scheiner, a certified diabetes educator and himself an insulin user himself since 1985, gives you the tools to "think like a pancreas"--that is, to successfully master the art and science of matching insulin to the body’s ever-changing needs. Free of medical mumbo jumbo, comprehensive, and packed with useful information not readily available in other books.


Newly Diagnosed (easier reading) Problems & Complaints with Diabetes

Comprehensive Information on Diabetes Problems & Complaints



Diabetes Forecast:  Helps people with diabetes and their families lead normal, healthy lives by providing information and support on all aspects of diabetes treatment, management and self care. Contains profiles of people with diabetes, recipes, diet and exercise articles.     IOH Rating 5/5 

 

Newly Diagnosed Diabetes Information
Information for those Newly Diagnosed with Diabetes                             Print Full Diabetes Complications Article

Complications of diabetes
Kidney problems


This section:    Kidney Problems

Other complications:

Amputation  *  Blindness  *  Diabetic Ketoacidosis  *  Diabetic Neuropathy  *  Diabetic Retinopathy  *
Eating Disorders  *   Erectile Dysfunctions  *  Foot & Skin Problems  *  Gastroparesis  *  Gum Disease *    Heart Problems  *
High Blood Pressure
 *  Infections  *   Infertility  *  Insulin Shock  *  Kidney Problems  *  Seizures & Coma  *
Peripheral Artery Disease  * Sexual Problems  *  Urologic Problems  *  Weight Gain  *  Weight Loss  *  Wound Care


Click on any link to read more in-depth information about each topic.  

Kidney Problems
Excerpts, edited for content from NIH Publication No. 03–4281

What do my kidneys do?

The kidneys act as filters to clean the blood. They get rid of waste and extra fluid. The tiny filters throughout the kidneys are called glomeruli (gloh-MEHR-yoo-lie).

When kidneys are healthy, the artery (AR-ter-ee) brings blood and waste from the bloodstream into the kidney. The glomeruli clean the blood. Then waste and extra fluid go out into the urine through the ureter. Clean blood goes out of the kidney and back into the bloodstream through the vein.

How can diabetes hurt my kidneys?

When kidneys are working well, the tiny filters in your kidneys, the glomeruli, keep protein inside your body. You need the protein to stay healthy.

High blood glucose and high blood pressure damage the kidneys' filters. When the kidneys are damaged, the protein leaks out of the kidneys into the urine. Damaged kidneys do not do a good job of cleaning out waste and extra fluids. So not enough waste and fluids go out of the body as urine. Instead, they build up in your blood.

An early sign of kidney damage is when your kidneys leak small amounts of a protein called albumin (al-BYOO-min) into the urine.

With more damage, the kidneys leak more and more protein. This problem is called proteinuria (PRO-tee-NOOR-ee-uh). More and more wastes build up in the blood. This damage gets worse until the kidneys fail.

Diabetic nephropathy (neh-FROP-uh-thee) is the medical term for kidney problems caused by diabetes.

How can I prevent diabetes kidney problems?

  • Keep your blood glucose as close to normal as you can. Ask your doctor what blood glucose numbers are healthy for you.
  • Keep your blood pressure below 130/80 to help prevent kidney damage. Blood pressure is written with two numbers separated by a slash. For example: 120/70.

    Ask your doctor what numbers are best for you. If you take blood pressure pills, take them as your doctor tells you. Keeping your blood pressure under control will also slow damage to your eyes, heart, and blood vessels.
  • If needed, take blood pressure pills that can also slow down kidney damage. Two kinds of pills can help:
    • ACE (angiotensin [an-gee-oh-TEN-sin] converting enzyme) inhibitor (in-HIB-it-ur)
    • ARB (angiotensin receptor blocker)
  • Follow the healthy eating plan you work out with your doctor or dietitian. If you already have kidney problems, your dietitian may suggest that you cut back on protein, such as meat.
  • Have your kidneys checked at least once a year by having your urine tested for small amounts of protein.
  • Have any other kidney tests that your doctor thinks you need.
  • See a doctor for bladder or kidney infections right away. You may have an infection if you have these symptoms:  pain or burning when you urinate, frequent urge to go to the bathroom, urine that looks cloudy or reddis, fever or a shaky feeling, pain in your back or on your side below your ribs.

 

 

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Page Updated 03/23/2006