Islets of Hope for persons newly diagnosed with diabetes

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Article by Lahle Wolfe. For reprint information e-mail: Editor@isletsofhope.com

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Links to more comprehensive information on complications of diabetes

Amputation
Blindness
Diabetic Ketoacidosis
Diabetic Neuropathy
Diabetic Retinopathy
Eating Disorders
Erectile Dysfunctions
Foot & Skin Problems
Frozen Shoulder
Gastroparesis
Gum Disease
Heart Problems
High Blood Pressure
Infections
Infertility
Insulin Shock
Kidney Problems
Lactic Acidosis
Seizures & Coma
Peripheral Artery Disease
Sexual Problems
Urologic Problems
Weight Gain
Weight Loss
Wound Care


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Newly Diagnosed Diabetes Information
Information for those Newly Diagnosed with Diabetes                             Print Full Diabetes Complications Article

Complications of diabetes
Eye problems related to diabetes


This section:     Blindness  *  Diabetic Retinopathy

Other complications:

Amputation  *  Blindness  *  Diabetic Ketoacidosis  *  Diabetic Neuropathy  *  Diabetic Retinopathy  *
Eating Disorders  *   Erectile Dysfunctions  *  Foot & Skin Problems  *  Gastroparesis
 *  Gum Disease *    Heart Problems  *
High Blood Pressure
 *  Infections  *   Infertility  *  Insulin Shock  *  Kidney Problems  *  Seizures & Coma  *
Peripheral Artery Disease  * Sexual Problems  *  Urologic Problems  *  Weight Gain  *  Weight Loss
 *  Wound Care


Click on any link to read more in-depth information about each topic.

Blindness

People often think of diabetes and automatically associate blindness and amputation.  By keeping your blood glucose in target range as often as possible and seeing your opthomologist regularly, you can greatly reduce the risk of blindness as a complication of diabetes.  Also included in our more comprehensive information section are products designed for persons with diabetes and a visual impairment.  (See our section on "Diabetic Retinopathy" for more diabetes-related information about eye problems and list of famous Blind Persons.  


Diabetic Retinopathy

High blood glucose levels damage delicate nerves in the eye.  The retina is slowly destroyed and impaired vision or blindness may result. 

Diabetic retinopathy often has no early warning signs. Even macular edema, which may cause vision loss more rapidly, may not have any warning signs for some time. In general, however, a person with macular edema is likely to have blurred vision, making it hard to do things like read and drive. In some cases, the vision will get better or worse during the day.

You may not get any signs of diabetes retina damage or you may get one or more signs:

  • blurry or double vision
  • rings, flashing lights, or blank spots
  • dark or floating spots
  • pain or pressure in one or both of your eyes
  • trouble seeing things out of the corners of your eyes

What can I do to prevent diabetes eye problems?

  • Keep your blood glucose and blood pressure as close to normal as you can.

  • Have an eye doctor examine your eyes once a year. Have this exam even if your vision is OK. The eye doctor will use drops to make the black part of your eyes (pupils) bigger. This is called dilating (DY-lay-ting) your pupil, which allows the doctor to see the back of your eye. Finding eye problems early and getting treatment right away will help prevent more serious problems later on.

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Page Updated 03/23/2006