Islets of Hope  Is diabetes a disability?  What civil rights laws protect diabetics?

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Written by Lahle Wolfe

Source:  Publication PA-04-2006; Revised 12/06; Published by Islets of Hope, Diabetes and civil rights law: "An overview of your legal right to equal access to programs, benefits, opportunity, accommodations, education, and employment"  Read full publication (.pdf)

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diabetes legal information education and daycare facility laws

Diabetes and Civil Rights Laws
The Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA)
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The ADA prohibits discrimination on the basis of a person’s disability, which may include diabetes, in private employment, State and local government, the United States Congress, public accommodations, commercial facilities including restaurants, transportation, and telecommunications.  In addition to the ADA most states also have their own laws prohibiting employment discrimination on the basis of a person’s disability.  Some state laws apply to smaller employers than the ADA (the ADA laws apply to employers with 15 or more employees) as well as offer other protections in addition to those available under the ADA.

 

Title IV:  Telecommunications relay services

This title applies to persons with hearing and speech disabilities and does not offer protection for diabetes itself.

Title IV addresses telephone and television access for people with hearing and speech disabilities. Telecommunications companies offering telephone service to the general public must have telephone relay service to individuals who use telecommunication devices for the deaf (TTYs) or similar devices. The Title requires common carriers (telephone companies) to establish interstate and intrastate telecommunications relay services (TRS) 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. TRS enables callers with hearing and speech disabilities who use telecommunications devices for the deaf (TDDs), which are also known as teletypewriters (TTYs), and callers who use voice telephones to communicate with each other through a third party communications assistant. The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has set minimum standards for TRS services.

Title IV also addresses television access for people with hearing and disabilities. It requires closed captioning of Federally funded public service announcements.

Title IV Complaints

For more information about TRS, Closed Captioning, and other disability-related communications issues covered under ADA Title IV, contact the FCC at:

Federal Communications Commission
445 12th Street, S.W.
Washington, D.C. 20554

(888) 225-5322 (Voice)
(888) 835-5322 (TTY)

Internet: http://www.fcc.gov/cgb/dro/

More information about Title IV of the ADA from the Federal Communications Commission

   

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